Newsroom

Archives for January 25, 2013

  • 31 Jan

    (State Journal) Daniel Eades says he knows from walking through the Morgantown farmers market that there’s a demand for fruits and vegetables grown in-state, but he also knows the barriers to entry to that business can be daunting.

    A recent study from West Virginia University shows the demand for locally grown fruits and vegetables has increased and the state has the potential to expand and profit from farming.

    Crop farming can be a viable business option in the state, and it’s an opportunity that could be missed if not invested in and protected, says Eades, WVU Extension Service community economics specialist.

    Read more of this article from the State Journal…

  • 30 Jan

    (WBOY-TV) It’s the middle of winter but most of us dressed like it were spring Tuesday.

    But changes in the weather can make work more difficult for farmers and loggers.

    The temperatures have thawed what once was frozen, including mud.

    Read more of this article from WBOY-TV…

  • 29 Jan

    (Charleston Daily News) At just 12 years old, Carter Taylor has developed some impressive farming and business skills over the last three years.

    “I believe in giving people good, quality meat, and I like taking care of animals,” he said. “I really like showing at different fairs.”

    Carter, a sixth-grader at Ripley Middle School, raises pigs and cattle on acreage throughout Jackson County. Some land belongs to relatives and some is rented.

    Carter’s main business is pigs. He sold 34 of them to 4-H and Future Farmers of America members in five counties last year. His purebreds have won grand champion for the last four years at the West Virginia State Fair.

    Read more of this article from the Charleston Daily News…

    http://dailymail.com/foodandliving/201301240089 [Dead Link]

  • 25 Jan

    (The Inter-Mountain) Dealing with diabetes on a daily basis can be a very confusing process. Locally, the West Virginia University Extension Service is providing a four-week session of classes to help people make more informed decisions while seeking the best and most up-to-date care possible.

    Dining With Diabetes is a program that strives to arm diabetics with answers to help people make the best possible choices regarding their health care. The first session was held Wednesday at the WVU Extension Office. Attendees completed health surveys, and received free blood pressure and A1C checks.

    Read more of this article from the Inter-Mountain…

  • 24 Jan

    (Pocahontas Times) Representatives from Pocahontas County Schools, the Pocahontas County Farmers Market, the WVU Extension office, High Rocks, farmers and elected officials all met at the McClintic Library in January to talk about expanding local foods in the county.

    Jill Young, coordinator of the Greenbrier Valley Local Foods Initiative, said the idea was to coordinate, develop, and support farmers in the region and bring economic returns for their efforts back to their farms.

    “You were invited to be here so that we could come together as a community in Pocahontas County and look and see what everyone is doing in their own little pockets and work together and start networking,” Young said. “We’re here to learn from each other and connect with each other, to see how we can take this local foods initiative forward.”

    Read more of this article from the Pocahontas Times…

    http://www.pocahontastimes.com/news/2013/01/24/
    local-foodies-brainstorm-in-marlinton [Dead Link]

  • 23 Jan

    (WBOY-TV) WVU Jackson’s Mill is unique for many reasons. It is home to the first state 4H club, and General Stonewall Jackson spent his childhood there.

    Jackson’s Mill held a public buffet Friday night to celebrate General Stonewall Jackson’s 189th birthday.

    Lewis County residents hold a special place in their hearts for not only Jackson, but also for Jackson’s Mill and its food.

    Read more of this article from WBOY-TV…

  • 23 Jan

    (News and Sentinel) Speakers for the West Virginia Extension Service dinner meetings have been scheduled.

    The meetings, which are at the Wood County 4-H Campground on Butcher Bend Road, are free, open to the public and intended to provide progressive education on improving management or marketing strategies for farmers and landowners. Dinners are at 6:30 p.m. and the programs will begin at 7 p.m.

    Read more of this article from the News and Sentinel…

  • 22 Jan

    (Charleston Daily Mail) The West Virginia University Extension Service is holding two programs this month to help educate residents about issues related to developing the Utica shale natural gas field.

    One program will be held Jan. 29 at the Parkersburg City Building. The second program is set for Jan. 30 at the Wetzel County 4-H Camp’s Mollohan Center in New Martinsville.

    Read more of this article from the Charleston Daily Mail…

    http://www.dailymail.com/News/statenews/201301220030 [Dead Link]

  • 22 Jan

    (WBOY-TV) AmeriCorps is looking for more than 500 volunteers to help their Energy Express program.

    The program is being run by the WVU extension service.

    Last year Energy Expresses worked with more than 3-thousand under-privileged kids in West Virginia.

    Through an eight week summer program, Energy Express helps kids eat healthier and work on maintaining and improving their reading skills.

    Read more of this article or watch the video from the WBOY-TV…

  • 15 Jan

    (The Republic) West Virginia University Extension Service is hosting an aquaculture forum this month for producers, regulators and educators.

    The forum is set for Jan. 25 and Jan. 26 at the Holiday Inn in Martinsburg.

    The extension service says topics include marketing strategies and research highlights.

    There also will be a supplementary field trip to the National Center for Cool and Cold Water Aquaculture.

    Read more of this article from the Republic…

    http://www.therepublic.com/view/story/
    04c6cd3167654cafad8358f0c5126d58/WV--
    Aquaculture-Forum [Dead Link]

  • 15 Jan

    Winter cooking school slated

    January 15, 2013

    (Fayette Tribune) Some of Fayette County’s top chefs will pool their talents beginning later this month for a winter cooking school presented by the Fayette County office of the WVU Extension Service.

    Oscar Aguilar from Diogi’s, Susan Jones from Gumbo’s, Dexter Lewis from Smokey’s at Adventures on the Gorge and Rezan Nese from Chetty’s at Adventures on the Gorge will be guest chefs at the school which opens Jan. 29.

    The school will be held each Tuesday for five consecutive weeks from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Lewis Community Foundation Christian Community Center, Central Avenue, Oak Hill.

    Read more of this article from the Fayette Tribune…

  • 7 Jan

    (Register Herald) Planning and developing a garden requires decisions — from what to plant to when to plant it. Gardening experts at West Virginia University Extension Service designed the 2013 WVU Extension Service Garden Calendar with this in mind.

    The free calendar is available at all county WVU Extension Service offices or downloaded at www.ext.wvu.edu.

    Read more of this article from the Register Herald…

  • 7 Jan

    (Charleston Gazette) One morning last month, representatives of the West Virginia Association of Counties and the WVU Extension Service attended a Monroe County Commission meeting to present a new honor, the first Live Well West Virginia County Award.

    Monroe County residents walked a total of 991.61 miles during the summer, about the distance from Union to Key Largo. They participated in “Summer Steps,” a challenge organized by the West Virginia Association of Counties, WVU Extension and the Gazette. It was inspired by Kate Long’s series “The Shape We’re In” that has appeared throughout the year.

    Read more of this article from the Charleston Gazette…

    http://wvgazette.com/Opinion/
    Editorials/201301040077 [Dead Link]

  • 2 Jan

    (WYMT-TV57) It’s America’s most infamous feud, and as most people know the Hatfields and the McCoys fought in our backyard.

    In fact, it was exactly 125 years ago on New Year’s Day when the Hatfields came across the mountain into Pike County and ambushed the McCoys.

    “It puts chill bumps on me still. It being New Year’s Day today. Actually the fire was probably still burning,” said Bob Scott who owns the property where the Randolph McCoy house used to be. Ironically, he is a Hatfield descendant.

    Read more of this article at WYMT-TV57…

  • 2 Jan

    (Herald Dispatch) New Year’s Day has been tied to the Hatfields and McCoys feud since 1888 — the year of the New’s Year’s Day showdown between the families and massacre at the home of Randall McCoy.

    In the 125th anniversary year of the event, the new National Geographic show, “Diggers,” will present new discoveries at the McCoy home detailing the McCoy homestead discovery at 10 p.m. Tuesday, Jan. 29.

    Read more of this article at the Herald Dispatch…

  • 2 Jan

    (Mail Online) The Hatfields and McCoys, America’s most infamous feuding families, have had new life breathed into the bitter rivalry thanks to the discovery of one of their most legendary battle sites.

    An archaeological dig has shed light on the New Year’s Day Massacre of 1888 which culminated with the last in a long list of deaths on both sides and brought bloodshed to an end.

    Artifacts have been unearthed where the home of patriarch Randall McCoy once stood, in the rural lands of Hardy, Kentucky on the 125th anniversary of the massacre.

    Read more of this article at Mail Online…

  • 2 Jan

    (Washington Post) The Hatfield clan New Year’s attack on Randolph McCoy’s cabin marked a turning point in America’s most famous feud — the homestead was set ablaze, and two McCoys were gunned down. Hatfield family members and supporters were soon thrown in jail.

    Artifacts recently unearthed appear to pinpoint the location of the 1888 ambush in the woods of Pike County in eastern Kentucky. Excavators found bullets believed to have been fired by the McCoys in self-defense, along with fragments of windows and ceramic from the family’s cabin.

    Read more of this article at the Washington Post…

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/researchers-bullets-
    found-in-ky-help-pinpoint-location-of-key-hatfield-mccoy-battle/
    2013/01/01/befa561a-5425-11e2-89de-76c1c54b1418_story.html [Dead Link]

  • 2 Jan

    (Williamson Daily News) “This entire experience has absolutely blew me away and has exceeded all of my greatest expectations,” stated WVU Extension Professor and Hatfield and McCoy Historian, Bill Richardson, while speaking with the Williamson Daily News concerning a recent archeology dig that yielded world-class artifacts linked to one of the families involved in the famous Hatfield and McCoy feud.

    “Shortly before dawn on Jan. 1, 1888, the Hatfield’s surrounded the McCoy cabin with the intent of killing all the McCoy family members inside. They got into a gun battle and then set the cabin on fire. The bullets we found appear to have been fired by the McCoy clan in the direction of the attacking Hatfield’s. These bullets have been buried in the ground for 125 years,” stated Richardson.

    Read more of this article at the Williamson Daily News…

  • 2 Jan

    (WCHS-TV8) Artifacts from the Hatfield McCoy Feud, including bullets that were fired during the feud, have been found.

    During filming of the new National Geographic TV show “Diggers,” the first ever archeological artifacts from the feud were found in rural Kentucky, according to a news release from West Virginia University. The artifacts discovered in Hardy include bullets fired during a key battle in the feud. Other items discovered include pieces of the McCoy cabin which was burned when the Hatfields attacked it on New Year’s Day 1888.

    WVU Extension Professor Bill Richardson was part of the discovery. “I cannot overstate how amazing this find is,” Richardson said. “We uncovered actual bullets that were fired 125 years ago during the feud. It is incredible to hold something like that in your hand.”

    Read more of this article at WCHS-TV8…

  • 2 Jan

    (Charleston Gazette) The Hatfield and McCoy Feud has had no shortage of oral history associated with this most persistent of American tales. But an announcement was made Monday of some apparent actual artifacts from the feud, including bullets fired during a key battle.

    “I cannot overstate how amazing this find is. We uncovered actual bullets that were fired 125 years ago during the feud. It is incredible to hold something like that in your hand,” said Bill Richardson, who has been a key figure in highlighting the feud’s history.

    Read more of this article at the Charleston Gazette…

  • 2 Jan

    (WSAZ-TV3) It’s a finding 125 years in the making.

    “These are world class artifacts; there’s never been anything like this found associated with these events,” said Bill Richardson, an extension professor for West Virginia University and authority on the Hatfield-McCoy feud.

    Bullets fired from guns shot by the Hatfields and McCoys, pieces of a McCoy cabin burned down during a New Year’s Day raid in 1888 that are scattered throughout the land near Hardy, Ky., were uncovered in October.

    Read more of this article at WSAZ-TV3…

  • 2 Jan

    (Associated Press) The Hatfield clan New Year’s attack on Randolph McCoy’s cabin marked a turning point in America’s most famous feud — the homestead was set ablaze, and two McCoys were gunned down. Hatfield family members and supporters were soon thrown in jail.

    Artifacts recently unearthed appear to pinpoint the location of the 1888 ambush in the woods of Pike County in eastern Kentucky. Excavators found bullets believed to have been fired by the McCoys in self-defense, along with fragments of windows and ceramic from the family’s cabin.

    Read more of this article at the Associated Press…